Selected Successes

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  • The Karnataka government along with ICRISAT is trying to change this and make small farms more productive, diverse and resilient to drought.
  • ICRISAT scientists trained farmers to conduct "soil health check-ups". By missing nutrients farmers have seen better harvests.
  • The farmer facilitators, a village level agricultural extension agents, makes sure that the farmers know about and use the Bhoo Chetana methods.
  • The Bhoo Chetana (land rejuvenation) project has been working on improving the livelihoods of farmers. Despite poor rains in 2011, three million farmers saw their yields increase by up to 66 percent, bringing in extra profits of USD 130 million.
  • Guruswami and Shanta started growing azolla fern in small ponds to use as soil fertiliser as well as to enrich the feed for their livestock. "Our cows have been giving us half a litre more milk since we started adding this to their feed and their milk has more fat," they say.

Bhoochetana

The scaling-up/out model was perfected in Bhoochetana in Karnataka, India through a unique partnership with the Government of Karnataka. “Bhoochetana” which means rejuvenation of soils where soil health mapping was used as an entry point for unlocking the potential of rainfed agriculture.
The program covered 4.4 million farmers with area coverage 5 million ha. For individual farmers, the benefit cost ratio of 2 to 14:1 with gross value of increased productivity accrued to be Rs 1872 crores (US$ 353 million) during five years.
– Increased crop yield by 20-66%
– Rise in agriculture growth annually above 5% since 2009
– Benefit cost ratio for the farmers 3-14:1 resulting in average gain of US$500 per ha per season
– Net benefits accrued in 5 years US$ 353 Million

Microsoft and ICRISAT’s intelligent cloud pilot for agriculture in Andhra Pradesh increase crop yield for farmers.

Microsoft and ICRISAT – Bringing Artificial Intelligence to agriculture to boost crop yield

Following the launch of the pilot in June 2016, that tested a new Sowing Application for farmers combined with a Personalized Village Advisory Dashboard for the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, the results show a 30% higher average in yield per hectare. The Sowing App was developed to help farmers achieve optimal harvests by advising on the best time to sow depending on weather conditions, soil and other indicators. The pilot was implemented in Devanakonda Mandal in Kurnool district and the Advisory applied only to the groundnut crop.

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Janki Bai from Dungaria, a remote village in Madhya Pradesh state, India, turned her barren 10-acre field and neighboring drylands into cultivable land by giving up an acre for a water harvesting pond. The watershed project helped farmers conserve rain water; grow new crops and better crops; and above all transformed their thinking.

The Padarlya-Siyalwada Model Watershed

Seventy-five per cent of Dungaria village was once dryland. Farmers cultivated a single crop during the monsoon season and for the rest of the year they worked as laborers in nearby villages to eke a living.
The watershed initiative ushered in changes that this area has never witnessed before. The availability of water throughout the year through rainwater harvesting ponds has led farmers to grow water-intensive crops like rice during the rainy season and crops like pigeonpea, chickpea, lentils, soyabean, etc., in the postrainy season. Adopting scientific methods of cultivation has helped farmers increase the quality and yield of crops.
Increase in production (tons per hectare*):

  • Wheat: From 2.1 to 2.9
  • Chickpea: 0.6 tons to 0.9 tons
  • Soyabean: 1.5 tons to 1.95 tons
  • Cropping intensity increased from 115% to 160%
  • Paddy is being grown in this area for the first time

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Hari Bai from Siyalwada village in Madhya Pradesh, India, knows how to deal with a fickle monsoon. The holistic approach of the watershed initiative equips her to help herself and others in her community too.

The Padarlya-Siyalwada Model Watershed

Seventy-five per cent of Dungaria village was once dryland. Farmers cultivated a single crop during the monsoon season and for the rest of the year they worked as laborers in nearby villages to eke a living.
The watershed initiative ushered in changes that this area has never witnessed before. The availability of water throughout the year through rainwater harvesting ponds has led farmers to grow water-intensive crops like rice during the rainy season and crops like pigeonpea, chickpea, lentils, soyabean, etc., in the postrainy season. Adopting scientific methods of cultivation has helped farmers increase the quality and yield of crops.
Increase in production (tons per hectare*):

  • Wheat: From 2.1 to 2.9
  • Chickpea: 0.6 tons to 0.9 tons
  • Soyabean: 1.5 tons to 1.95 tons
  • Cropping intensity increased from 115% to 160%
  • Paddy is being grown in this area for the first time

Read more

Sarda Bai lives in a village on the forest edge that receives abundant rain and yet faces water scarcity. Here’s the journey of a woman who started off as a laborer and is now a businesswoman and proud farmer. A fine example of how the model watershed project in Siyalwada, Madhya Pradesh, India, has transformed lives.

The Padarlya-Siyalwada Model Watershed

Seventy-five per cent of Dungaria village was once dryland. Farmers cultivated a single crop during the monsoon season and for the rest of the year they worked as laborers in nearby villages to eke a living.
The watershed initiative ushered in changes that this area has never witnessed before. The availability of water throughout the year through rainwater harvesting ponds has led farmers to grow water-intensive crops like rice during the rainy season and crops like pigeonpea, chickpea, lentils, soyabean, etc., in the postrainy season. Adopting scientific methods of cultivation has helped farmers increase the quality and yield of crops.
Increase in production (tons per hectare*):

  • Wheat: From 2.1 to 2.9
  • Chickpea: 0.6 tons to 0.9 tons
  • Soyabean: 1.5 tons to 1.95 tons
  • Cropping intensity increased from 115% to 160%
  • Paddy is being grown in this area for the first time

Read more

Mr Aashish Kshetry, Vice President – Supply Chain, Asian Paints, Community development project involving water management.

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

IDC is in a position to develop win-win propositions for the corporate sector and the public by channeling CSR projects to benefit millions of smallholder farmers as well as protecting the environment to achieve sustainable development.
The IDC is working with number of CSR projects with Power Grid Corporation Ltd; Rural Electrification Corporation; JSW Foundation; SAB Miller, India; Coca Cola Foundation, India; and Asian Paints Ltd are poised for takeoff over the next five years.
IDC is implementing large scale impact oriented projects as a win-win strategy to achieve sustainability for water, energy and reducing environmental foot prints as well as demonstrate corporate social responsibility.

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